The Evolution of Knowledge Management [Infographic]

Last month, I wrote about my approach to content aggregation and curation.

More and more, I’ve been asking myself, “when does knowledge management include content curation?” At what point does the collection and curation of media on a specific topic enable the adoption of insights and experiences from individuals or organizational processes or practices?

Content curation is the practice of integrating and contemplating media content using a combination of machine and human resources. The practice includes aggregation (collecting) and curation (organizing, categorizing and sharing) such that content from multiple sources creates a unique editorial experience for readers. In other words, a content curator continually identifies, aggregates, filters, organizes, contextualizes and shares the most relevant content on a specific topic.

Knowledge management encompasses a range of strategies and practices used in an organization to identify, create, represent, distribute and enable adoption of insights and experiences. Such insights and experiences comprise knowledge, either embodied in individuals or embedded in organizational processes or practice.

I came across this infographic recently at the Socialcast Blog. Their description of a knowledge worker — an employee whose job depends on tacit information that is rarely documented, limiting an organization’s ability to draw upon it in the future — and the need for solutions to collect and preserve tacit knowledge made me immediately think of content curation.

At what point does the collection and curation of media on a specific topic enable the adoption of insights and experiences from individuals or organizational processes or practices? I think it depends on the topic and the extent of curation. As Knowledge management becomes more social, I think we’ll begin to see that knowledge management frequently includes content curation.

The Evolution of Knowledge Management
Via: The Future of Work

Walter Jessen is a digital strategist, writer, web developer and data scientist. You can typically find him behind the screen something with an internet connection.

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